Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Wednesday with David: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
By Roald Dahl
Illustrated by Faith Jaques
Cornerstone Books 1985
From our shelves (apparently from my fifth grade teacher!)

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

The story: Little Charlie Bucket and his family are on the brink of starvation when the mysterious Mr. Willy Wonka opens his chocolate factory to five lucky children. Charlie finds a golden ticket in a candy bar he buys with some change he finds in the street. Charlie and his Grandpa Joe join spoiled Veruca Salt, gluttonous Augutus Gloop, gum-loving Violet Beauregarde, and television obsessed Mike Teavee for an unbelievable journey through Mr. Wonka's Chocolate Factory.

Mama opines: Does any child not love this story? Roald Dahl has such an amazing imagination and a true gift for knowing what appeals to children. It's interesting for me to observe how David acts when we are reading a chapter book as opposed to a book with pictures. The edition we are reading does have a few pictures, but a majority of the pages are just text. When we read a picture book, he tends to look at the illustrations and read a few words when I prompt him. As we read this, he tends to stare off into space or fiddle with a toy until something funny makes him laugh. We are having a lot of fun with this one and I think we may try Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator next, which neither of us have read yet!

Thoughts from David: I like it because of the chocolate. Well, chocolate is pretty yummy and the chocolate factory opens with no kids. The gate is opened and they go up to the top and then they go back down on the lift. One girl turns in to a giant blueberry!
Favorite part: When they ride the lift and it goes up and up and up! 


What is your favorite Roald Dahl book? 

2 comments:

  1. I liked James and the Giant Peach! I remember also being kind of scared by it, but in a fascinated way.

    So glad David is enjoying Roald Dahl!

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    1. That's a great one too, but if I remember correctly it's a little cruel. Something happens to his aunts, I think?
      A child's sense of justice is so fascinating. David was really concerned for all of those terrible children in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, while of course we adults realize that it is ultimately harmless and well deserved.

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